featured-image

The Way The Rotors Work on This Helicopter WIll Mess WIth Your Head!

This wicked looking aircraft is the Kaman K-Max helicopter. Relying on a unique ...

This wicked looking aircraft is the Kaman K-Max helicopter. Relying on a unique intermeshing rotor layout, the K-Max has eliminated the need for a stabilizing tail rotor thanks to the twin overhead rotors that offset the rotational effect of one main rotor.Thanks to the twin rotor design, not only is the aircraft inherently stable, but it has a high external load capacity that actually exceeds the weight of the chopper itself.

Able to lift over 6,000 pounds, the K-Max is one powerful machine, and it looks pretty cool to boot.The front end takes on a decidedly insectoid shape, looking like a cross between a mantis and a grasshopper when viewed from the front. The narrow v-shaped fuselage is both streamlined and sturdy, providing the pilot a great view in all directions, including downward. When the overhead rotors spin up, the awesome sound of the turbine engine screaming to life is eventually overtaken by the wind noise of the rotors whipping through the air.

The K-Max has only one seat, though one or two more seats can be attached, although they are attached externally to help with spotting the activity below when the chopper is being used to lift. However, the chopper was built as simply as possible to allow a single pilot to operate it effectively. It is powered by a single Honeywell Turboshaft turbine engine that is built for strength and durability. The fuel tanks – centrally located to help with stability – hold just over 200 gallons. The K-Max, introduced into military service in 2010, helps move cargo around in the harshest of environments. The military is currently looking into designing an updated version with unmanned control systems to further protect our pilots lives. Hopefully that comes into fruition and even fewer of our fine military men and women will have to risk their lives to get their jobs done.



How awesome is that?

Posted by Engineering World on Wednesday, July 12, 2017



Premium Partners

Speed Society partner MichelinSpeed Society partner Cobb TuningSpeed Society partner Mustant DynoSpeed Society partner Zero To SixtySpeed Society partner VP Racing FuelsSpeed Society partner K&N Filters

Interested in becoming a partner? Contact us for more info.